The One-Minute Easy Exercise You'll REALLY Benefit From!

It can help keep you mobile, treat incontinence and improve your sex life. What are you waiting for?

If you struggle to find time to work out or forever find the excuse that you just don't have time, you have no excuse for avoiding this exercise.

This one-minute exercise is great for pelvic stability, and also if you're experiencing sensitivity issues in your sex life or incontinence problems. Simple and easy to do, without any sort of equipment, you can do it in the safe confines of your living room or even sitting at your desk.

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What is a pelvic floor?

Your pelvic floor is a term for the muscles located between your legs, running from your pubic bone to the base of your spine.

In order to find your pelvic floor muscles try and stop the flow of

urine when you're on the toilet, the muscles you feel are the ones

you're wanting to strengthen.

Why should you do pelvic floor exercises?

If your pelvic floor muscles aren't strong then it could cause you many different problems.

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  • Stability of the pelvic floor and general mobility
  • Sex: A weak pelvic floor could lead to sensitivity issues while having sex.
  • Incontinence problems: You may not be able to gain control of your bladder.
  • Pregnancy: They will tighten your muscles for after giving birth and help to decrease your chances of incontinence issues.

How do you do pelvic floor exercises?

Luckily this exercise can be done anywhere – even when you're at work, as no one will even know you're doing them. Jenni Russell, a pelvic floor expert, talks us through how to do the exercises.

1. First identify those pelvic floor muscles by breathing into it. Relax the body and breathe in deeply. As you breathe in, your pelvic floor will automatically raise and as you breathe out it will lower. Spend some time getting used to this movement.

2. Next actively draw the pelvic floor up, as though you are zipping yourself up from the bottom of your spine to the belly button - drawing in the tummy as you do.

3. Remember to breathe and relax when you're doing it. The breath helps to take vital oxygen to your muscles, helping to repair and strengthen them.

4. Try and do it for at least a minute every day or a few minutes if you have time. Remember you can do it anywhere – waiting for the bus or even while you're at work.

After a month or so you should start to see improvements in any symptoms you had. Even if you do see improvements, continue with the exercise every day to keep it strong.

Via

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