This Twitter Thread Revealed the Horrifying Truth Behind the Indian Idol Auditions

Rudeness, verbal and physical abuse are just a few things contestants have to endure. 

Madhavi Pothukuchi
 

We all love drama, don't we? Even the least dramatic person will look twice when there's a heated argument going on. It's human nature. But it is also the reason we love/hate reality TV. You may love it outright, and catch shows like Keeping With The Kardashians or Bigg Boss. You may even cringe watch these shows, because you just can't seem to be able to take your eyes off of the hot mess. Whatever the reason, we all do it. But have we ever thought about how exactly these shows are made? 

By the virtue of being reality TV, one would think that the process is transparent — because it's all on camera, it's reality. Right? Unfortunately, multiple reports and investigations have proved that reality TV is just as scripted (or even more) than fantasy fiction. And it's especially sinister when it comes to competitive shows like Indian Idol, Roadies, and Masterchef. We are always shown certain snippets, but never the full story — turns out, there's more of a sinister reason for that, as explained by this man on his Twitter. 

Nishant Kaushik, an established author, tweeted about the time he decided to go for Indian Idol auditions, in May of 2012. He described how there was a huge queue, for kilometres, that had started early in the morning and just continued to grow. These people were completely mistreated by the organisers, who apparently did not provide any water or food, or even a place to sit anywhere. They were only shepherded from place to place, mocked by the organisers, and finally auditioned only at night, after a full 20 hours of waiting. Kaushik goes on to describe how the organisers slapped a participant, who asked when the auditions would happen. They were also openly mocked and laughed at. 

Read the thread here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This has obviously sparked major outrage, with people questioning the validity of the show. Mini Mathur, who is a former host on the show, tweeted agreeing with his statements, calling it the end of organic TV. 

This thread highlights many important issues about ethical programming and the kind of reprehensible lows, we, as a population, have sunk to. These horrific acts will not happen, if we, the audience, refuse to watch and validate their gross shows. We need and deserve better content and better working.