Highlights from Day 3 and 4 of FDCI X Lakme Fashion Week

If you have missed the action, here’s a recap

The Fashion Design Council of India and Lakme Fashion Week’s first-ever joint phygital, seasonless fashion week had an interesting line up of designers on both Day 3 and 4. For the first time in India, the fashion week also introduced drive-in fashion shows, where audience seated in cars could watch the models walking down the ramp set up in a vast open area. Here are highlights from the shows that stood out.

Day 3

Nidhi Yasha The collection titled “The Gypsy’s Wife” tried to portray the free, nomadic spirit of a gypsy woman through theatricality in clothes. Flirty ruffles, fringes and rich tassels over sheer layers, dramatic volumes, tell-tale surfaces to tribal and nature-inspired prints aptly captured the bohemian ethos. Opulent velvets, delicate silk charmeuse and diaphanous organzas and chiffons were used together at times to create fluid silhouettes that were cinched at the waist by embroidered leather corset belts.

Nidhi Yasha

Masaba Gupta

Masaba’s resort wear collection called ‘Masaba Land’ put the focus on her prints—quirky, exotic and vibrant, florals and animal motifs—some new and some popular ones from her design repertoire. The collection included flowing kaftans, easy breezy shirts, cover-ups and numerous fusion separates. There were a few saris too in an assortment of colours, prints and patterns, with varying choli styles.

Masaba Gupta

Gauri and Nainika

Designer duo Gauri and Nainika collaborated with Marie Claire to present a collection called “An ode to our mother’s garden”. The collection included the typical Gauri and Nainika romantic and feminine ensembles with huge bows, ruffles, flower textures with trapeze cuts and dainty prints. Fabrics such as wispy organza and sheer chiffon added an element of drama to the overall look and feel of the clothes.

Gauri and Nainika

Suneet Varma

The designer added a touch of fairytale to Indian wear in his “50 Shades of Happiness” collection. Ruffled sleeved cholis with tiered tulle lehengas, intricate embroideries and mirror work adorning the garments, and a vibrant colour palette of red, hot pink, peach and yellow were the key highlights of the collection.

Suneet Varma

Day 4

Limerick by Abirr and Nanki The collection “Aurora” by Limerick, focused on resort wear inspired by the 400-year-old art form of Pichwai. Each outfit with a contemporary silhouette brought to life traditional motifs. Sharp linear formations in shades of turquoise, pink, purple, and navy were juxtaposed against ancient artworks of lotuses. The designers used crepe and organza together to create an interplay of sheers and solids to narrate a story of resilience in the times of the pandemic.

Limerick by Abirr and Nanki

Siddhartha Tytler

Siddhatha’s collection “Studio 54” was inspired by the iconic club of the same name. He showcased structural corsets, bodycon dresses, peasant tops, co-ord sets, tee shirts and track suits in a colour palette of mustard, blue, black, grey, teal and whites. The fun and flirty clothes were embellished with sequins, crystals and embroidery.

Siddhartha Tytler

Samant Chauhan

The designer showcased his collection titled “New Born” that looked at breaking the monotony of being confined indoors due to the pandemic and stressed on the need to celebrate life. There were a bevy of dramatic silhouettes with intense sleeves, flowy fabric and shimmery details.

Samant Chauhan

Payal Singhal

It was Indian athleisure collection, fun and Gen–Z friendly line that Payal Singhal presented in collaboration with R|Elan. Payal presented an interesting line-up of kurta-jogger sets, and coordinates, slinky dhoti saris, unconventional cropped-top jogger saris and balloon lehengas, with cropped tops and flowing dupattas.

Payal Singhal

Nitin bal Chauhan

“Faux-Amis/false friends” collection by Nitin Bal Chauhan used fluid and sheer new-age fabrics to create a range of futuristic gowns for women. The designer also debuted his formal menswear at the show—a line of immaculately sharp, tailored jackets and trousers. The clothes were adorned with interesting 3D embroidery.

Manish Malhotra

Manish’s bridal wear featured opulent, oversized jackets and colour blocked lehengas, Kalidar kurtas, diaphanous lehengas, dramatic gowns, swirling shararas, kurtas and palazzos. The colour palette ranged from sorbet and blush shades such as vibrant pink to serene lilac, and grey-blue and royal beige-gold. Powder blue played a major role, while metallic gold-silver shimmered and monochrome black and white brought an end to the colour card. The fabrics matched the variety of colours as pure two-toned silks and Dupion silks, vied for attention with gold silks, sheer organzas, lush crepes and elegant tissue fabrics.

Manish Malhotra