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Why Should You Get Your Heart Checked Post Covid-19?

As per a recent study done by the Oxford Journal, it was revealed that at least 50% of people who were hospitalised due to COVID-19 have suffered from heart damage even after recovering from the disease.

Today, September 28th, India recorded less than 20,000 cases for the first time in 200 days. According to the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, the country's active caseload further dropped to 2,92,206. While we all breathe a sigh of relief hearing this news, we cannot forget the long term health issues that this catastrophic virus can cause. In fact, as per a recent study done by the Oxford Journal, it was revealed that at least 50% of people, who were hospitalised due to COVID-19 have suffered from heart damage even after recovering from the disease.

Dr Nishith Chandra - Director, International Cardiology, Fortis Escorts Heart Institute, New Delhi tells that it is important to get your heart checked after one has recovered from COVID-19. He tells Cosmo, "There are three ways in which the heart can get affected. The first mainly affecting the youngsters because they are facing changes in their heart rate, it is increasing and decreasing at different paces. Secondly, often many who have recovered from the disease face thrombosis. This occurs when blood clots block veins and arteries. Lastly, people suffer from complications because the virus has weakened the heart muscles."

Those who did not suffer from COVID-19 are at equal risk because of long working hours and less movement. WHO found out that there have been approximately 7,45,000 alone from stroke and heart disease. The alarming rise in the number of deaths has become a cause of concern ever since the onset of the pandemic in 2020. Long working hours have also led to people suffering from hypertension leading to hypertensive heart diseases.  

Dr Samanjoy Mukherjee, Consultant and Senior Interventional Cardiologist, Cardiac Science, HCMCT Manipal Hospitals, Dwarka shares, "It is important to manage stress levels and follow a proper sleep routine as preventative measures because the lack of activity has escalated pressure on the heart." Dr Samanjoy further explains how our routines have lead to an increase in conditions such as obesity and diabetes which are directly linked to heart failure. He adds, "The number of people working long hours is increasing and currently stands at 9 per cent of the total global population. This puts even more people at risk of work-related disability and sudden cardiac arrest."